D30 Libertarian sends out mailers in momentary void of GOP Candidate

Gideon Oakes isn’t letting any grass grow in the current void in the District 30 Senate Race while local Republicans decide whether to replace Candidate Lance Russell with Bruce Rampelberg, or if they’ll choose to ponder the legalities of replacing Lance Russell with Lance Russell.

Oakes, the son of State GOP Secretary Marilyn Oakes, has sent out a mailer attempting to capitalize on the vacancy aspect:

26 Replies to “D30 Libertarian sends out mailers in momentary void of GOP Candidate”

  1. Anonymous

    To nominate the guy who lost the primary or the guy who gave up the seat after he won the primary?

    I like and respect both of these guys though I don’t believe that either probably should be the Senator. If Gideon were a Republican he’d probably walk in.

    Is it possible to have Gideon switch parties in an attempt to be the nominee? It’s not like he hasn’t been involved in GOP politics for a long time.

    Reply
  2. Anonymous

    Meade County is going through the process right now, but there will likely be 8 candidates slated before the election. Lots of interest. A little searching that area would be best. If one could talk Jim Lintz into running, that would be the best choice! He’s as conservative as they come as he has a ton of common sense. And if not him, maybe his son, Beau would run. He’s got good genes.

    Reply
  3. Anonymous

    Rampelberg and Russell have both served well. One lost. The other vacated the seat 15 days after blocking rampelberg.

    A new candidate is probably in order.

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    1. Anonymous

      One who #1 – can win the job and #1a – wants the job should be requirements. It’s probably time for new blood in the appointment process. The R will win.

      Reply
  4. Gideon Oakes

    Thanks for the kind words, Anonymous 1:49. As for seeking the GOP appointment, believe me when I say it’s been brought up to me more than a couple times. 🙂 But I’ve been running since March on a concept of “principle over partisan politics”, and switching parties simply to help ensure victory is about as far-removed from that ideal as I can imagine.

    While my campaign pledges mirror the GOP platform a good percentage of the time (closer than many GOP lawmakers’ voting records, if we’re being frank), I’m very content in a party which prioritizes both fiscal conservatism and individual liberty.

    The elephant for whom I hauled water those many years is dead.

    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      G-dog: Your first initial is G, your last initial is O and everyone knows you put the P in Party. You are GOP. Take the appointment.

      Reply
      1. Gideon Oakes

        There aren’t many who call me that. 🙂 Nice to see you on WarCollege!

        In addition to the principle of the situation, there would also be a logistical and legal issue. The same law that prevents Sen. Russell from getting back on the ballot would also preclude me from jumping even if I wanted to (which, again, I don’t). SDCL 12-6-55 clearly states that no name withdrawn from a ballot may be printed on that same ballot. I’m on the general ballot already, so to change parties I’d have to withdraw.

        Nope. I’m in it to win it. And that’s only going to happen through good old fashioned hard work. Now, if the D30 GOP central committee members choose not to appoint anyone, it wouldn’t necessarily hurt my feelings. But, I’m not exactly getting my hopes up. 😉

        Reply
    1. Gideon Oakes

      @Anonymous 4:37 — I am a Christian, conservative, heterosexual, gun-owning, outdoors-loving, red-blooded American man. When I need to self-medicate, I turn to campfires and chocolate chip cookies, not pot.

      My lifestyle works for me, and it works for my family. But my way is not the *only* way — and I understand that. I certainly don’t want the government stepping in to approve or deny my own “traditional” values, so why should I expect the government to do just that to those who don’t happen to share my worldview?

      This issue used to be a stumper for me, but when I look at it through the same filter as firearm ownership, it all of a sudden is pretty easy… I don’t like marijuana, so I don’t smoke marijuana. And at this time, I have no medical need for cannabinoids, so I don’t use them. That’s my choice, and I will fight for my right to make that choice for myself. I will fight just as hard for my friends who choose otherwise. I think we’ve wasted a whole lot of time, money and lives battling a plant. If we’re going to waste the taxpayers’ money on something drug-related, we’d be better off treating addicts rather than creating criminals out of otherwise law-abiding citizens.

      Reply
      1. Anonymous

        That is the correct answer, Gideon. I applaud you for being one of the few self-proclaimed “conservatives” here who actually understands what that means. If I could vote for you I would.

        Reply
  5. Charlie Hoffman

    Excellent explanation Gideon. You just wrote an Op-Ed explaining why Congress and every President since and including Nixon have gotten it wrong. Creating criminals and Narco Terrorist Billionaires.

    Reply
  6. Lee Schoenbeck

    Gideon is a righteous dude (even if he’s wrong on pot). Best wishes my friend. Wish you still had that great shop where you studied free enterprise….while making great sandwiches

    Reply
  7. Anonymous

    Nope! The Black Market sold within states that legalized is thriving from small time criminal and gangs. The legal pot shops find it hard to compete with all the illegal outlets popping up and then there are the illegal grow operations from the highly environmentally destructive illegal grows on public lands that Mexican gangs are using highly toxic and illegal chemicals used to keep bugs and animals from eating into their profits to mold. Many wildlife are getting killed including endangered to streams and wells being poisoned due to contamination and now they do not have enough law enforcement to go after all of this and that does not count the high cost of environmental cleanup.

    Teen use is up in states that legalized and the industry helped manipulate the CDC data in which in Denver which has by far the highest density of pot shops none of those shops did not fill out the CDC survey. Crime is up, more black and brown people arrested, Colorado has one of the highest Opioid addiction rates, auto insurance rates have gone up far more than surrounding states due to driving while stoned accidents and fatalities, public smoking of pot is common where it is supposed to be illegal. Not good!

    Reply
      1. Anonymous

        Oh really? These organizations which you can start with have their sources listed reflecting the negative social and economic costs from legalization that the industry is doing their best to whitewash.

        Marijuana Accountability Coalition
        Smart Approaches to Marijuana
        Parents Opposed to Pot

        Reply
  8. Gideon Oakes

    This is actually one of my biggest frustrations with being a Libertarian, and it has more to do with perception than reality. People hear the word “Libertarian” and all of a sudden they can’t focus on anything but pot. Their eyes glaze over (no pun intended) and it’s the only word they hear come out of our mouths. Nevermind calling for sound economic policy, or lassez-faire governance, or unrestrictive firearm policies and other civil liberties… No, everybody wants to talk about pot like it’s the only idea we ever had.

    I’ve got lots of friends on both sides of the discussion (Hi Lee! Hey Charlie!), so getting militant about the matter does no good. It’s just frustrating to have our narrative get defined by one single, solitary issue that is truly but a subset of our much larger discussion on civil liberty.

    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      Gideon a large weakness of Libertarians is that much of it is based on theory that would apply perfectly if we lived in a perfect world and everyone would be responsible, ethical ,considerate of others in nice neat little bubbles. Unfortunately we do not live in a perfect world and that is where it all falls apart.

      Reply
      1. Gideon Oakes

        You’re certainly right that it’s not a perfect world. But if we’re to err, I will always say it’s best to err on the side of freedom. History has proven over and over what happens when it goes the other direction.

        Reply
    2. Anonymous

      Gideon said: “No, everybody wants to talk about pot like it’s the only idea we ever had.”

      It’s a good litmus test to verify the consistency of your position. If you’re pro-freedom in many areas but not with respect to marijuana, you’re a hypocrite.

      Reply
    3. Anonymous

      pot and other mind altering drugs always look to be the primary focus of those party members besides escaping accountability for their actions.

      Reply

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