Daschle supporter to Weiland – Get out, you can’t win. Throwing support behind Pressler.

Native American publisher Tim Giago who famously supported Tom Daschle in his last time out running for the US Senate had a message for Democrat Rick Weiland today. In a nutshell, he asked him to get out of the race, because he can’t win:

In 1980 the U. S. Census proclaimed Shannon County, the heart of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, as the poorest county in America. Thirty-four years later Shannon County still ranks among the top 10 poorest counties in America. During much of that time the Democrats have held the senate and house seats in this state. I have written time and again, “What in the world have they done to bring an end to this travesty?” The answer that comes up is always; “little or nothing.” And so I have urged my fellow Lakota to take this into consideration and not to blindly follow a Democrat simply because that is what they have always done. During those 34 years the Republicans have often held the power and they also can be categorized as “do-nothings” when it comes to solving the poverty problems of the state’s Indian reservations.

and…

I think Rick Weiland is a great guy, but I believe that Larry Pressler stands a better chance of winning the senate seat away from the Republican Rounds. I started this column talking about “selflessness” a true description of what Chad Taylor has done in Kansas. I believe that the only way Democrats or Independents can stop the Mike Rounds Express is to throw all of their support behind Larry Pressler.

Read it all here.

58 Replies to “Daschle supporter to Weiland – Get out, you can’t win. Throwing support behind Pressler.”

    1. Anonymous

      Only if you want to give Pressler more of a shot, which I don’t; we don’t need Pressler or Weiland in any position of power because they are both goofballs.

      Reply
  1. Anonymous

    The drumbeat is getting louder for independent candidates. I don’t think Rounds has run a good campaign and that has sacrificed much of his popularity.

    His staff is supposed to be his shield and they have not been protecting his image from negative and false attacks.

    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      Get attacked by both sides and see how well you do! Primaries were the chance to get the parties to elect a candidate and forge ahead unified.
      Now the crazy independents who mostly are now disenfranchised Rs and Ds fracture the votes and muddy the waters so nobody can run a “great” campaign these days.

      Reply
      1. Anonymous

        If you spend $2+ million in a primary against candidates that don’t total $250k and you don’t shore up your image you are not putting the resources into a good strategy. After the primary Weiland had a much more comparable sum of cash to Rounds.

        All I’m saying is Rounds should have been more frugal early on in the primary rather than spending so much money.

        Reply
  2. Anonymous

    This is from conservative professor Jon Schaff: “Rounds is in trouble. He is relying on Pressler and Weiland splitting the non-Rounds vote. It is not good that now in multiple polls have 55-60% of voters supporting someone other than Mike Rounds. The Democrats have won the EB-5 debate and will continue to beat Rounds with this. Rounds will likely have to get aggressive. We’ll see if Kristi Noem and John Thune come to his rescue. I’d be interested if those to politicians agree to campaign with Rounds or appear in ads with him. Weiland has run an almost perfect campaign and Rounds will have to work hard to win, which I still think he will. ”

    http://southdakotapolitics.blogs.com/south_dakota_politics/2014/09/my-thoughts-on-the-senate-race.html

    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      Two thoughts on Schaff’s comments:

      1. I don’t think Weiland has run a perfect campaign but he has done much more than anyone expected – especially on raising money. He is unelectable simply because of his positions and how he has pushed SHS out of the race but his attacks are making the race more fluid and that probably gives Pressler a chance to pick up those up for grabs votes.

      2. I agree that the Rounds camp lost the EB-5 battle and that is mostly because they chose not to fight the misinformation early on. By disregarding the lies Stace Nelson and Rick Weiland were pushing you are seeing this issue seep into the electorates mind for almost a year now without ever hearing a firm and aggressive attempt to set the record straight.

      When lies go uncorrected perception becomes reality.

      Reply
  3. Anne Beal

    The problems on the reservations will never be solved by socialists, because socialism is the problem. While socialism works in family or small tribal (extended family) units headed by patriarchs with dictatorial powers, it’s not scalable.
    I lived on Standing Rock. I know how property rights work: if you have a blanket you haven’t used for a year, you must give it away. If you have a telephone in your home you have to let everybody in the community use it. If you own a car you must chauffeur everybody else around. If you maintain your dwelling, you must take in people who have rendered their own uninhabitable. Add to that the fact that all means of production are owned by the state, the dependence on federal largesse, and you have people with no hope, no incentive to finish school, work hard, or even take care of themselves. No matter how much they try, they will never improve their circumstances.
    I saw the same things in people from the former Soviet Union: premature aging, alcoholism, poor dentition, flat affect, and obesity. This is what socialism does to human beings

    Reply
    1. Jammer

      That was very well written and quite accurate. Now if you can just help explain to “moderates” why they need to abandon crony capitalism.

      I am not sure why there are so many Republicans who will read your comments and completely agree with you, but then turn around and support Republican politicians who facilitate crony capitalism. I guess there is a disconnect somewhere along the thought process.

      However, if we want to prevent the spread of socialism in this country we must do everything we can to protect free market capitalism and that begins with ending crony capitalism. I hope you will take the same passionate stance against that as you did in your well written comment above. While politicians cannot change what was done in the past, they most certainly can change their positions going forward.

      http://capitalismmagazine.com/2014/07/crony-capitalism-socialism/

      Reply
      1. Anonymous

        Comrades,

        My worry is that we have one honest liberal, and one liberal that put the big R on his sweater claiming to be a conservative as Governor and another independent liberal who in the past put an R on his sweater. Both of those liberals in disguise are known for Cronyism and are what we do not need in DC! We have one true Conservative left and that is Mr. Howie.

        Reply
        1. Anonymous

          it is rounds’ misfortune that his second term as governor was taken up by handling the blowhard blowback created by a democrat US Congress. he did remarkably well holding the unfunded federal mandates down, and he unfairly gets the blame for what was quickly approved by 90 percent margins in a republican legislature to comply with federal law. rounds is a conservative in the minds of people who don’t have an inkling of what you mean when you call him a ‘liberal’ because they never attend the past five years worth of TEA party meetings. when you’re tired of crazy town the party will still be here for you.

          Reply
          1. Jammer

            Well that was poorly stated.

            I think you forget about what happened after Obama beat McCain in 2008. Most Republicans had gone into hiding. If it had not been for the TEA Party, I am not sure if the “PARTY” would be here today.

            I sincerely believe the TEA Party saved the Republican Party on a “national” basis in 2010. I think your comment demonstrates either your naivety or your ingratitude or perhaps both.

            Reply
            1. Anonymous

              the TEA party was awesome and widespread for part of a year in 2009, then the arch-conservative demagogues moved in and the dirty secret nobody mentions is that a lot of the general popular support evaporated in the years since. what does a person have to look forward to in SD if they attend a tea party meeting? the same few dozen faces they avoided a decade ago, and the golden chance to put gordon howie in this or that office every time they turn around. that’s kinda depressing.

              Reply
              1. Anonymous

                continuing – – the TEA party woke up a lot of people who were only casually involved with politics, and maybe gave a new foothold to the republican party in some areas, but with regard to mike castle in Delaware and other races and places they maybe did more harm than good overall. the TP has an especially tough row to hoe in SD because it was already a conservative state and you have to then be uber-steroid conservative to differentiate yourself or nobody gets excited about the tea party. I just have never seen any actual statewide power or influence exhibited in the years since 2009. staunch conservatives actually got more done under bush and rounds.

                Reply
                1. Jammer

                  Several thoughts regarding your comment:

                  1. Mike Castle was BARELY better than any democrat. While you may have to tolerate that in states like Delaware, Castle really was bad.

                  2. When the TEA Party is going to get behind candidates, they really should be ahead of the curve and RECRUITING the candidates they want to support. Almost always they end up supporting somebody who entered the race on their own and was not the strongest candidate to begin with as in Delaware.

                  3. The TEA Party label has been co-opted by so many different elements that when most people refer to the TEA Party, they are really clueless on what they are referring to. In some cases, actual democrats have registered TEA Party as a legitimate political party in order to siphon off votes from a Republican candidate and then there have been some national organizations that use the TEA Party name to advance their own personal agendas.

                  4. In some cases the TEA Party groups would be much better served to use their influence to move moderate Republicans to more conservative positions rather than supporting an unelectable candidate that is only 10 – 30% different than the “establishment” Republican.

                  5. Conservatives should limit their passion and fighting to the primaries. If they can’t win there, the conservative cause is rarely strengthened by “burning bridges” in the general election. As they say; “he who burns bridges better be a darn good swimmer”.

                  6. Conversely, the moderates need to get behind conservatives when they win in the primaries. The way the party abandoned Mourdock and Akin was embarrassing and what the they did in the Mississippi US Senate primary this year was an embarrassment to anyone who calls themselves a Republican.

                  Reply
                  1. Anonymous

                    Mike Castle can vote wrong 60% of the time as long as he votes right on the majority leader. Not everyone is a robot and not everyone in the GOP should have to be a conservative policy analyst for a think tank. Common sense ideas are as important as ideology.

                    Reply
                    1. Jammer

                      You don’t understand.

                      Certainly ideas need to be common sense and that should be an exclusive requirement for many things. However, when it comes to how you are going to make your ideas a reality, that is where the principles come in. Principles are the rules you follow in reaching your objectives.

                      You appear to be one of those people who are willing to rely on “feel good” solutions and unfortunately they never work. The landscape is littered with “feel good” solutions that have failed and cost taxpayers trillions of dollars. And whether a “feel good” solution comes from a democrat or a Republican, they don’t work. However, they certainly do make the low information voters “feel good” and help keep the politicians who proposed them in power (well sometimes). We might see the purveyors of the Obamacare “feel good” solution go down to defeat in November.

                    2. Anonymous

                      i would say your castle sentence this way: castle would have been elected by a majority of Delaware voters to do Delaware’s business in Washington, he was already a former gov and current congressman, he was a proven statewide winner for the republicans in Delaware. at her best, christine o’donnell would only ever have represented or earned the vote of a minority percentage of Delaware’s blue state electorate. she lost big every time she got to a general election. we wise pundits in south dakota shouldn’t expect one-size-fits-all politics across the nation.

          2. Anonymous

            Comrade,

            Liberal disguised as a Conservative Pressler is drawing votes from Rounds. Liberal disguised as a Conservative Rounds is losing his lead against Honest Liberal Weiland with EB-5 scandal growing momentum. We will lose our chance to retake the Senate. Rounds needs to drop out of the race now and think of the big picture and not just about him. He needs to endorse Mr. Howie. It is our best chance!

            Reply
            1. Anonymous

              Mr. Nelson warned us in the primary what would happen to Rounds prior to the general election. Rounds needs to drop out now!

              Reply
      1. William Beal

        “American Indian Russell Means gives an eye-opening 90 minute interview in which he explains how Native Americans and Americans in general are all imprisoned within one huge reservation… Means warns that Americans have lost the ability of critical though, and with each successive generation become more irresponsible and as a consequence less free, disregarding a near-perfect document, the Constitution.”

        Reply
  4. Anonymous

    as a rounds supporter i’ll tell you that i could put up with pressler if i had to, but not weiland. it is all academic, apologies to the awesome mr giago, because the money supporting weiland is doubling down on suppressing the republican turnout as much as possible.

    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      and if weiland can tighten up the margin with rounds he’ll turn and give pressler a whack that will make his great grandkids crosseyed.

      Reply
  5. The Democrat Dilemma

    Democrats have a choice to make. Not support a candidate for the second consecutive senate election in SD.

    Thune went unopposed and now Dems are conflicted about Weiland. I’m sure much of that is because of what they see happening in Kansas.

    Reply
    1. Jammer

      That was not a very good article and must have been written by a liberal. While I agree with portions of its analysis, I totally disagree with its conclusion.

      Reply
            1. Jammer

              Nope, but I did have to run for the bathroom last night. If “running for office” is anything like that, it would not be a pleasant experience. 🙂

              Reply
        1. Jammer

          If you go to Monticello and take a tour of Jefferson’s home, you will soon come to the conclusion of just who is behind the foundation that runs the facility. Progressive liberals have infiltrated that foundation and are busy misrepresenting history in a light that advances their agenda. Just tagging something with a name doesn’t make it conservative, it merely fools the “low information” voters.

          Reply
            1. Anonymous

              Jammie: you’ve accused President Lincoln of being a Marxist. George Washington was a contemporary of Adam Smith: both advocated for an invisible hand to guide labor and capitalism.

              By your definition every dude on Mt. Rushmore is a commie: right?

              Reply
  6. Anderson

    Collect all the toys while here on earth, then when the man asks you what you did on earth tell him what you just said,I for one beleive in conservatism but the good book says to help and pay a decent wage, thats why the dems are winning on minumim wage.

    Reply
    1. Jammer

      There are only 2 reasons that democrats ever win anything. They win when they are able to get enough “low information” voters to actually vote or if that fails, there is always the age old democrat standby “voter fraud”.

      Reply
      1. Anonymous

        good points jammer – but I’d add that horrible candidates always hurt you (reexamine sarah palin in 2008) ineffective campaigning hurts you (reexamine McCain in 2008) and not knowing your enemies hurts you. remember George W Bush won twice and he clearly expected the worst from the media at all times. most other national Republicans act like they’ve never actually watched these networks in action, and don’t display a clear sense that they understand the effect of the networks’ biases on public opinion, or that there’s any kind of danger for republicans. the media needs to be cleaned up.

        Reply
  7. El Kabongg

    Tim Giago has one of the most intelligent and excellent minds in the whole state of South Dakota. If he says Rounds will win unless Weiland drops out, I’d take that to the bank. What goes unspoken is that Rounds could and would win even if Weiland drops out.

    Reply
  8. Troy Jones

    Jammer,

    I agree with most of your points. I disagree on Castle, Mourdock, and Akin.

    Castle: While definitely not a conservative on social issues, he was as conservative on economic issues as you could expect from Delaware.

    Mourdock & Akin (applicable to Angle in Nevada and others too): I think your #2 applies. If you want to promote a more conservative candidate and expect to win the general election, get strong candidates. Mourdock to some degree but definitely Akin did not have the skills to handle the rough and tumble that is politics and got pulled into doing “unforced errors.” Personally, I’m not as incensed by Mourdock because many didn’t see that implosion and considered him capable. However, few who knew Akin and had watched him up close and personal as a Member of Congress were surprised he did what he did.

    Reply
    1. Jammer

      Once again an outright lie. But why should we be surprised?

      Mike Castle was not a conservative on economic issues. Here is a link to the Club for Growth and their analysis of Mike Castle’s voting record. The Club for Growth only scores economic related issues and does not get into social issues at all.

      http://www.clubforgrowth.org/scorecards/?party=0&scyear=2010&chamber=0&state=DE&nm=&submit=Search

      Castle had a lifetime score of 39%. That in no way qualifies him for being called an economic conservative of any degree.

      But once again another lie to sell your liberal agenda and paint it as conservative. People who use lies to sell their points of view lose all credibility.

      Reply
  9. RINOs R' Us

    You have to love all the RINOs telling people that Republican candidates don’t all have to be conservatives, and that they are just as good of “Republicans” when they are pragmatists. The problem with this line of crap? Those pragmatic politicians (like Marion Rounds) claim to be conservatives to fool the voters in to voting for them.

    The only difference between a pragmatic “Republican” and a DC Democrat? Is the crooked establishment they support.

    Reply
      1. Anonymous

        r-rus, you guys think you’re the cure for corruption, but when you get low percentages of the electorate overall and you use your manufactured dramas to derail well-meaning conservative men and women into financing and voting for your perfect but unwinnable candidates, who is the corrupting influence, and who is hurt? i used to see your point, but i can’t see it any more because i’m tired of the guaranteed losing. too much is at stake.

        Reply
  10. Troy Jones

    Jammer,

    I know you don’t have the emotional maturity to handle someone who mostly agrees with except on one matter. However, you should have the integrity to read what one says accurately and then disagree without a denigration of one’s honesty.

    I specifically said he was an economic conservative (low taxeand regulation) by Delaware standards, which isn’t your standard or Club for Growth. Delaware has a reputation for being the “Vermont on the Shore” as it was called “infamously” by Republicans in Congress.

    To my point, Senator Coons has a 12% rating. Maybe you don’t think it is significant but I think that 39% looks good when you combine control of the Senate.

    Disagree with me all you like. But characterizing my comment as a lie only makes you look like a child. What are you 12?

    Reply
    1. Jammer

      This issue has ZERO to do with control of the senate, that is merely a smoke screen that you have drug into the discussion in order to give yourself cover. You said: …………..”Castle: While definitely not a conservative on social issues, he was as conservative on economic issues as you could expect from Delaware. ” …………………. And that is SOLELY the issue I was addressing – PERIOD.

      You tried to push it as a FACT to sell your agenda and it was not accurate. Most people I know call a conscious telling of an untruth a lie. The only people that I know who don’t are liberals. Perhaps if you would have claimed that you merely misspoke and was wrong people might have believed you. However, this attempt to SPIN your way out of it tells a completely different story.

      And now you are selling Delaware as “the Vermont on the shore” in an attempt to slide by your previous untruth. Well Vermont has elected a socialist as a US Senator and we all know how socialists score on the conservative scale when it comes to economic issues. And the rest of the Vermont delegation is no better. You should have quit when you were ahead.

      And nobody in their right mind would call a 39% score a conservative. Yes, it is an eyelash better than Coons, but he is a borderline socialist. You have set an awful low bar to determine who YOU consider a conservative. But then again, no surprise.

      The data simply does not support ANY of your claims. Here is a link to the National Right to Life scorecard that rates legislators on social issues.

      http://capwiz.com/nrlc/scorecard.xc?chamber=H&state=US&session=111&x=12&y=14

      They rate Castle at 33% on their social issues. That is so very interesting when you have claimed that Castle DEFINITELY was NOT a conservative issue on social issues when he scores a 33% but then you turn around and claim he is an economic conservative when he scores a 39%. Don’t bore us with your “splitting of hairs” type SPIN. Outside of your minions, not too many people are believing what you say any longer.

      Reply
  11. Troy Jones

    Jammer,

    I am sure in your parents basement, it seems easy to cast aspersions and think you know everything.

    It is my opinion that Castle is as economically conservative as one can expect from someone aspiring to be elected from Delaware.

    The last GOP US Senator fro Delaware was Bill Roth (known for Kemp-Roth tax cuts and Roth IRA). He was a moderate by almost all measures but one Reagan appreciated and did a lot to support because he stood with the GOP when his vote was really needed. I worked with his staff (Roth chaired the Finance Committee and the issues I handled often went through Finance) during my time with Abdnor on a lot of issues so I got a firsthand appreciation for the political environment of Delaware for Republicans.

    Ultimately, Roth got beat in 2000 because he stood with the GOP too many times during the Clinton years. Since then, Delaware has gotten decidedly more blue.

    Personally, Senator Castle would never be one of my favorites but I’d sure rather have him than Coons, who will be a Senator for as long as he wants the position. And, that to me is a darn shame.

    Reply
    1. Jammer

      The issue has nothing to do with Coons. The issue is that you tried to tell people that Castle was an economic conservative and he is not. Your comment was consciously intended to mislead people.

      And your defense of your completely untrue statement is that you would sooner have Castle in the Senate rather than Coons. And while there are not many people who would disagree with that, you have been the only person to tell others that Castle was a conservative in the hope that they would accept your untruth as FACT. Sorry, but that did not work. Castle is not nor was he ever a conservative.

      Here is a link to an article that talks about the man YOU call a conservative;

      http://www.redstate.com/diary/gmeliberty/2010/08/04/what-would-mike-castle-really-do/

      What you said was not true, accurate or factual. Why don’t you just admit it?????????

      Reply
  12. Troy Jones

    Jammer,

    It is my opinion and I gave my rationale. I am sorry I didn’t preface my remarks with “this is my opinion.” It was unrealistic that you wouldn’t understand most of what is asserted on a political blog is opinion. I should have known better. My mistake for over-estimating you. I am sorry. I should have known better.

    P.S. I have been told your animosity toward me is you are jealous that you can’t get hired by anyone politically and nobody in real life will take you serious. I am also sorry your self-esteem is so low. That said, I don’t coddle as I think it just results in an even lower self -esteem long-term.

    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      it takes a long time to unwind the snake in your head when its been there for a few years. but you have to make the effort.

      Reply

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