Day 2 of The GOAC Meeting. Committee time is still twitter time for Senator Nelson.

So, is it standard operating procedure now for legislators to live-tweet from legislative hearings when they don’t get their way in committee, as opposed to paying attention to the business at hand?

We’re in hour one of day 2 of the Government Operations and Audit Committee, and Senator Stace Nelson is already tweeting away instead of paying attention to the hearing….

Oh look, taking audience pictures too. No selfies?

Really?  Pretty soon the chair is going to have to collect cell phones like in high school…

11 Replies to “Day 2 of The GOAC Meeting. Committee time is still twitter time for Senator Nelson.”

  1. Steve Sibson

    From my experiences, it is common practice for legislators to use electronic communications during committee hearings.

    1. Pat Powers Post author

      Such as taking pics of the audience and posting them in the middle of committee meetings? I was listening to it live when this was happening.

  2. Anonymous

    We get the point. Legislators ought to pay attention in committee meetings. Nelson ought to put down the phone and pay attention. But if he’s not the only one on his phone let’s hear about who everyone else is that’s not paying attention. Who else is tweeting, texting, browsing?

    1. Anonymous

      The only thing Stace is getting is put in his place. He has no professionalism, he’s been scolded numerous times, been called out of order, has continually berated and disrespected his fellow GOAC members. Stace is a disgrace to his position and his service.

      1. Tara Volesky

        Stace has the qualifications and more experience in fraud investigation than anybody on the panel. It’s disrespectful not to let him submit all of his findings.

  3. Michael Wyland

    It seems I was one of the few people *not* photographed by the Argus or Stace Nelson during this morning’s meeting – and I testified! 🙂 Seriously, I didn’t notice the photos being taken. It’s also not uncommon for legislators to step away and leave the room during a committee meeting for a variety of personal and professional reasons.