Gov. Noem Proclaims Wednesday, April 8, 2020, as Statewide Day of Prayer

Gov. Noem Proclaims Wednesday, April 8, 2020, as Statewide Day of Prayer
Encourages South Dakotans to Share Prayers on Social Media

PIERRE, S.D. – Governor Kristi Noem has proclaimed Wednesday April 8, 2020, as a Statewide Day of Prayer.

“I’m encouraging all South Dakotans to join together to pray for an end to this pandemic,” said Noem. “We should pray for the success of our fight against this disease; for comfort to those who have suffered loss; and for strength to all those who continue this fight, both in South Dakota and around the world.”

As part of the Day of Prayer, Noem has encouraged South Dakotans to share their prayers on social media using the hashtag #PrayforSD.

“South Dakota will get through this together. Please share your prayers to encourage our fellow South Dakotans during this difficult time,” Noem continued.

To learn more about resources to fight COVID-19, please visit COVID.sd.gov.

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33 Replies to “Gov. Noem Proclaims Wednesday, April 8, 2020, as Statewide Day of Prayer”

  1. Ike

    O Great Noodly One! Awaken thee from thy drunken stupor and placeth upon us thy wriggling appendage that we may know now in these darkest of times that inaction dressed up as action cannot save us from thy saucy wrath. Blessed be the doctors, nurses, garbagemen, and Destinee, the meth-addicted tattooed gal behind the counter at Casey’s. Grant us the al dente wisdom to remain socially distant in this life so that we may know the joys of gathering near our friends and loved ones in the shadows of the great Beer Volcano and Stripper Factories of the afterlife. We beseech thee keep us warm in the moistness of your warm, meaty balls. Oh, yeah… and #PrayforSD

    R’Amen.

    Reply
    1. Ed Randazzo

      It’s an absolute abomination that men and women have fought and died so that this reprobate has the right to pollute. These are the times that I struggle with His charge for us all to forgive.

      Reply
      1. Anonymous

        No, men and women fought and died for Ike’s right to say that. It is offensive to me for the government to say we should pray (to their god, no doubt).

        Reply
      2. Anonymous

        As a practicing Catholic, I find the idea that everyone must conform to our beliefs as an abomination. Be free and pray to whoever suits your religious ideology. That is what a free country is about.

        Reply
  2. Cliff Hadley

    There is real fear out there — not only about the virus, but about livelihoods. Just about every business is limping along, trying to figure how to keep the doors open and keep their employees. There’s no way to plan. It’s all day-to-day at this point. My hunch is, we’ll lose half our restaurants and most of our retail if this goes into June.

    Prayer is a powerful thing. That’s why Ike mocks it.

    Reply
    1. Ike

      My prayer to the does as much for me as yours does for you. His Spaghetti-and-Meatballness has blessed me with a PPP loan from the SBA. I only pray now that there’s beer at home in my fridge when I get off work today. I only feel bad for those who just didn’t pray hard enough for government hand-outs.

      Reply
      1. God is Real

        It’s quite apparent you do not believe in God or you would not be mocking the almighty. With that being said, you are free to do as you please but, answer this. What happens if you are wrong? If you are wrong and God is indeed real, what does that mean for you? I ask this respectfully because I know what awaits you and that is a permanent separation from Him as we were made for Him.

        On a side note it kind of reminds me of when people say “Trump is not my President” because they dont like him or acknowledge him. It does not change the fact he is your president, acknowledgement, respect, or any other feeling do not change that fact. I liken it to God, he is your God whether you acknowledge him or not.

        Just something to ponder, God Bless You sir!

        Reply
        1. Anonymous

          A weird recitation of Pascal’s wager. And you don’t “know” what awaits you. You have strong faith and belief, and there isn’t anything wrong with that.

          Reply
        2. Ike

          If you are wrong and God is indeed real, what does that mean for you?

          And what if you are wrong, and should have been worshiping Zeus all this time? But you don’t believe in Zeus, Ra, Enlil, Ahura Mazda, Odin, or literally thousands upon thousands of other gods. I just go one god further, so we’re a lot closer than you’d care to admit.

          Reply
          1. Anonymous

            Ike – I asked you a question first, you are deflecting. One of the most famous Atheists of our time C.S Lewis came to Christ and wrote a booked called Mere Christianity, its worth a read and short. I mean this seriously and not trying to throw shade. What if you are wrong?

            The list is long of reasons why I know GOD is not wrong and the GOD I serve is the only GOD that exists. If I were to say I was right it would insinuate I know all, which is not true. God is right and I follow him to the best of my exceedingly flawed abilities.

            Reply
            1. Ike

              Pfft. I’m not wrong. Delude yourself all you want to help you sleep better at night and pretend you’re doing something by babbling nonsense at invisible non-existent sky men… just keep the f’ing government and public at-large out of it. I’ll be over here actually working to keep people in their jobs and placing my faith in the actions of others who do more than fold their hands and whisper platitudes.

              Reply
      2. Anonymous

        Ike… Even with government help, many businesses will fail by the time the virus runs its course. I pray for the owners and employees and customers. Hopefully the Covid-19 infections and deaths are few. I pray for victims and their families.

        And even though you deny the comfort and efficacy of faith, I’ll pray for you, too. May you meet Jesus.

        Reply
  3. Troy

    This type of a conversation is alway so bizarre.

    I believe in a God who made Heaven and Earth, a God who loves us, and a God whose Grace and Providence helps us navigate this temporal world. And because of this belief, I am inspired to do Good as an expression of gratitude. I pray like everything depends on God and do as if it all depends on me.

    Others, like most of the posters above, do not believe as I do. What I don’t get is why their response to those who believe is so cynical and sarcastic. If for no other reason than to not be so cynical and sarcastic, being a believer seems like a better way to go through life.

    Back to the matter at hand- Dear Lord, as I navigate this challenge before us, I ask for your bounty to come down on those who get sick, those who care for the sick, and those who love the sick. Amen

    Reply
    1. Ike

      We have an illiterate orange philandering entitled mean-spirited putz for our president, and you don’t think anyone should be cynical?

      Reply
        1. Ike

          Found the strawman, Dorothy!

          Did I tell you that you can’t pray? Pray all you like. My problem is with the Governor declaring a “day of prayer”. And while you scream that she didn’t specify to whom we’re supposed to pray, I’d prefer my governor just govern and leave the praying to individuals, families, and churches where it belongs. What’s Troy’s favorite line again? Oh yeah. “Virtue Signalling”.

          Reply
  4. Anonymous

    For those who don’t believe in praying, it’s likely seen as a day of inaction, of ineffectiveness, throwing your hands in the air and hoping for a miracle, a day lost in this fight that needs to be happening here on earth by humans. Pray privately, act publicly.

    Reply
  5. Anonymous

    I can understand your stance on this and I at least respect it. Comments like those from Ike show his “disdain” for Christians. These are the types of folks I get frustrated with as they get so upset anytime Prayer or God comes up. If folks like this are so convinced they are right and God does not exist, why would you be so upset about it all the time. I have noticed many Atheist get angry about the subject of God and it puzzles me as to why they are angry at my beliefs. I am not “angry” with their beliefs and I accept them for who they are. Many folks are religious and choose to pray, that is their choice and like it or not, this country has been a Christian since its founding, that doesn’t just stop. Look around, God is on our Money, The Declaration of Independence, etc. Instead of being “mad” debate. Instead of calling names, ask questions. Throwing out things like mysterious sky God, or praying for Meatballs is not productive and only makes you look like an @sshole. The funny thing is if God does not exist there really is not Good or Evil, right or wrong. If we are left to our own, we can justify anything based on OUR own worldview. If you notice on the Left side of the isle, they are moving that direction as the rules for moral behavior and what is ok is moving all the time because they have nothing to the Guide them.

    Reply
    1. Ike

      Then stop putting your religion in my government. We get “angry” at christians (et. al.) because they can’t seem to separate what should be a personal matter from public matters. Y’all pass garbage laws about education, abortion, childcare, transgender bathrooms, gay marriage, immigration… and then you wonder why people who don’t share your views are upset?

      And don’t even start on your bs false choice morality bunk. Society decides what’s right and wrong, good and evil. Those concepts can exist entirely without a religious framework.


      May the Flying Spaghetti Monster bless you with his noodly appendage.

      Reply
      1. Troy

        “Y’all” and “garbage laws” is an indication of bigotry.

        Every person, regardless of race, creed, religion, sexual orientation, or preference in movie genre’s, gets to come to public square and make their case regarding public policy. In a democracy, we aren’t promised “good laws.” We are promised all a voice in the public square. That’s it.

        And, in a democracy, there is no person who gets to decide what are personal matters or public matters as if they are an either/or. Every matter in the political arena is both personal and public where the process determines the public sanction.

        Reply
        1. Ike

          LOL – offended by “y’all”? Go back through my post history and y’all might find I say ‘y’all’ [y]all the time as a regular pattern of speech, y’all.

          Meanwhile, your other argument falls flat in that on the one hand you’re arguing against oppression, and on the other allowing the majority to oppress at-will. Nice! Maybe we can just leave your god out of our public matters… or stop complaining about “sharia law” invading your space?

          Reply
          1. Troy

            “Y’all” in the context of making a generalization is bigotry. And your response is further bigotry as you deem views have different merit based on whether one is a believer or not.

            I’m opposed to the death penalty and I get to come to the public square and advocate it. My Right to advocate for an ended is neither enhanced or diminished if my motive is I think it cruel punishment, taking on a prerogative of God, or disproportionate punishment, or a preference of anarchy.

            I’m opposed to abortion and I get to come to the public square and advocate is elimination. My Right to advocate for an end is neither enhanced or diminished regardless of my rationale.

            Your entire argument is my rationale is relevant to both my right to advocate it and whether my view is licit to prevail as a matter of public policy. If my rationale and motive is similar to yours, I get to come to the public square. If my rationale and motive is related to my views on religion, you think I shouldn’t be allowed the public square, influence policy or get my view reflected in law.

            In other words, your bigotry is manifest in who you think are worthy to be in the public square with you.

            Reply
            1. Ike

              You’re more than welcome in the public square – just don’t expect me to follow along and whisper sweet nothings to the almighty. Y’all can do that on your own, no governor required.

              Meanwhile, people who spout nonsense about silver-infused toothpaste curing COVID-19, autism-inducing vaccines, and gargling with zinc like some sort of sacrificial anode martyr deserve to be mocked for wasting our time and public resources. If that’s bigotry, I guess you’ll just quietly accept sharia law when the islamists attempt their takeover.

              Reply
  6. Troy

    Ike, your feckless attempt to lump those policies (which aren’t theological matters) to impugn all people of religion is using the logic fallacy known as association fallacy to justify your bigotry.

    Most bigots are a bit more creative and intelligent. Just saying

    Reply
    1. Ike

      You’re acting under the assumption that your god is to be taken as truth/fact/reality with zero empirical evidence… believing in something fake is believing in something fake. No association fallacy there.

      Reply
      1. Troy

        I am making no assumption. You however are assuming all believers can not only be lumped together on all matters and are to be disregarded on all matters because they are believers. To do so employs a whole host of logic fallacies and is overtly bigoted to a level which makes me wonder if you aren’t John Glanzer or a moral and intellectual equivalent.

        Reply
        1. Ike

          I wasn’t “lumping in” anything – just pointed out that believing in silly ideas with non-credible evidence doesn’t stop with religion – people believe all kinds of stupid things. When those same people present their case with solid, actual evidence, then I’ll listen.

          For whatever it’s worth, I have no doubt of the efficacy of prayer for the individual’s mental wellbeing. I simply find no proof that prayer affects the physical world. The Gov. asking for a day of prayer therefore is a nice gesture for your spirit, but it does nothing to stop people from becoming ill or dying. As I said in my own prayer (first post), inaction dressed up as action is a waste of time and resources.

          Reply

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