Noem Bill to Keep Fugitives Off Social Security Receives Committee Approval

Noem Bill to Keep Fugitives Off Social Security Receives Committee Approval

SD Sheriffs: Noem’s efforts hold wanted felons and parole violators accountable for their actions

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Introduced by Rep. Kristi Noem, the Control Unlawful Fugitive Felon (CUFF) Act was approved late Wednesday by the House Ways and Means Committee. The legislation would prohibit individuals with outstanding felony warrants or parole violations from receiving certain Social Security benefits. The bill is estimated to save more than $2 billion.

“It’s incredible to think that a wanted felon can evade prosecution for months – even years – and yet somehow still receive government-issued checks every 30 days or so,” said Noem.  “This legislation is commonsense. Taxpayers shouldn’t be asked to make payments to people who are running from the law.”

“We greatly appreciate Representative Noem’s efforts to hold wanted felons and parole violators accountable for their actions,” said Staci Ackerman, Executive Director of the South Dakota Sheriffs’ Association. “This bill will also limit their ability to avoid justice using taxpayer dollars to evade capture.”

The CUFF Act discontinues Supplemental Security Income payments for those with an outstanding warrant, parole violation warrants, and probation violation warrants. Benefits can be restored once the individual resolves any outstanding issues.

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6 Replies to “Noem Bill to Keep Fugitives Off Social Security Receives Committee Approval”

  1. David Barranco

    I agree. In 2014, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), a kind-hearted program intended to help disabled Americans, misspent $5.1 BILLION on improper payments. To curtail such waste, Noem’s common sense proposal — stop giving wanted felons SSI – seems wise. As she explained, “Taxpayers shouldn’t fund people running from the law.”

    Many progressives disagree. Urging Democratic Senators Boxer and Feinstein kill the bill, San Francisco’s AIDS Legal Referral Panel said giving billions to wanted criminals is justified because “a high percentage of recipients struggle with substance abuse, intellectual disabilities, or mental illness” and “a significant number will become homeless if payments cease.” Substance abuse is a serious concern; Americans are sympathetic the plight of those caught in addiction’s grip. Yet, the claim that wanted felons risk becoming “homeless” without federal financial support is… not the most cogent argument. For these fugitives, law enforcement has a specific home prepared.

    As Texas’ Sam Johnson, Chairman of the Ways and Means Subcommittee, stated, “Individuals running from the police or violating parole shouldn’t be supported with taxpayer funds.” Even capturing these felons won’t end the abuse. A 2013 audit showed 20,000 New Jersey inmates collected nearly $24 million in state and federal benefits. In Pennsylvania, 1,000 inmates received (on average) $334 per week. Thousands of convicts – resting in jail, eating free meals – took in more $$ than a typical minimum wage earner. Our government actually withheld money from entry level workers’ paychecks and delivered it to incarcerated crooks! To remedy this injustice, another vital reform, the “PERP Act,” ends prisoners’ unemployment benefits.

    The CBO expects these conservative corrections will save taxpayers several billion. Perhaps, in a perfect world, compassionate Americans would shower generosity upon all God’s creations, even convicted felons. In this world, where our national debt has now surpassed $20.2 trillion, greater austerity is required.

    Reply
  2. Troy Jones

    David Barranco said: “Perhaps, in a perfect world, compassionate Americans would shower generosity upon all God’s creations, even convicted felons.”

    Perhaps not as well. Sometimes showering generosity in the form of government aid is worse than doing nothing. We have to get out of this mindset that the government not solving the problem means we don’t care about a solution or the problem. Not only are there problems the government can’t solve but too often the only thing they do is make it worse.

    Reply
    1. David Barranco

      “Sometimes showering generosity in the form of government aid is worse than doing nothing. ”

      Terrific point, Troy. You’re 100% correct. Although I favor government tax cuts and private charity, sometimes we do others no good — even actual harm — when our well-intentioned gifts enable & prolong self-destructive lifestyles.

      “Not only are there problems the government can’t solve but too often the only thing they do is make it worse.”

      Quite true. Dependency can become habitul. Certain folks must hit rock bottom to see the error of their ways. Like Mom always said, “God helps those who help themselves.”

      Reply
  3. Anonymous

    Leave it to idiots like Boxer and Frankenfeinstein to say something like this is a bad idea; what morons.

    I would also stress the need to hunt down those and prosecute those who collect disability fraudulently; there are people (crooks) out there who get disability for physical impairments and yet are out there working on their farms on at their jobs and making good money while soaking taxpayers to pay them and their children for their “disability”. Lest there be any socialists/liberals out there who decry my “heartlessness”, I am talking about the very real fraud of people whose disability claims are an outright lie, not those who legitimately receive government assistance. (That should go without saying, but you know how socialists/liberals are always looking for ways to be offended)

    Reply

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